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Winning at bicycle infrastructure: The true story of how a dream team, a touch of magic and Yay Bikes!’ special sauce made Columbus’s first protected bike lane happen

By now the news has been shared far and wide: Columbus's first protected bike lane will soon be installed from Hudson to 11th in the University District! Read the details here and here to boost your day with some YAY and more YAY! Both articles give a nod to the role Yay Bikes! played in helping nudge this project forward with our infrastructure review process:

"Original plans called for a conventional bike lane, but the city reconsidered its position after engineers rode with representatives from Yay Bikes, a local advocacy and education group."—Dispatch article

"The important thing about this, though...was the interactions between the department and Yay Bikes!—this is not engineers in a hermetically sealed room designing a project. Catherine and the folks at Yay Bikes were instrumental in making this what it is."—Rick Tilton, Assistant Director, City of Columbus Department of Public Service

"I will say this, I like to ride my bike but I've always ridden on the trail system—I had never ridden on the street—and Yay Bikes! invited us to go out on a couple of different occasions and actually ride on the street with them. And, before the ride, I thought it was going to be really scary, but it turned out that drivers were very courteous, and it wasn't frightening at all. You want to pay attention to what you're doing, but it was just like you were in any other vehicle. At the time of Yay Bikes ride on Summit and Fourth, the protected lane was not a done deal... we were thinking about it, but it was still in the planning stages."—Richard Ortman, Engineer, City of Columbus

But as much as we'd like to, obviously Yay Bikes! can't take all the credit for the new protected lane. So how do advocacy wins like this actually happen? To the extent that we can take credit for it, we at Yay Bikes! believe our advocacy philosophy played a role that I will detail below. Beyond that, let's not underestimate the roles that leadership, timing and, frankly, magic play in creating the big advocacy wins that many groups fully claim. For example, at this precise moment in history, as the stars align within the U.S., Ohio and Central Ohio—the U.S. Department of Transportation's Secretary Fox has issued a Mayor's Challenge to improve bicycle safety; the Federal Highway Administration is committed like never before to promoting bicycle safety; the Ohio Department of Transportation is making bicycle safety projects, including exciting demonstration projects like this, a priority for the safety funding it distributes; Columbus's Mayor Michael Coleman often states his intention to make Columbus one of the best bicycling cities in the country; Columbus' Director of Public Service is investing heavily in a new relationship with us, the local bicycle advocacy organization; and Yay Bikes! is sufficiently successful to provide the level of expertise now in such high demand. Each of these players comprise the "dream team" that made this protected bike lane happen, and they all deserve a big fat standing O for their work.

But returning to how Yay Bikes! conducts the business of bicycle advocacy. As with all things Yay Bikes!, our cooperative advocacy philosophy flows from our core values of Kindness, Excellence & Integrity. Taking the case of this protected lane as an example, the following are our underlying assumptions and how they translate into our advocacy practices.

YAY Bikes! evaluates roadways for bicycle usage.

Assumptions + Practices

Everyone is more accommodating when they are treated with kindness.

We all want safe, functional streets. Even engineers who don't yet see the value of accommodating bicyclists want streets that work. Our practice is to treat everyone with kindness and to be selective about who we permit to interface directly with project staff in the name of Yay Bikes!. Typically shaming people or making their lives more difficult does not move our agenda forward.

Everyone brings different, valuable expertise to the table.

It is critical that both advocates and professionals work in partnership to design roadways. Advocates (i.e., both paid staff and organization members) bring essential knowledge of road riding, while the project design team brings a wealth of professional expertise and experience. To capture the best of the expertise from both groups, our practices are to 1) open participation in the commentary process to our membership, the intelligence of the group is greater than any one individual, 2) lead the design team on a ride of the route to evaluate their proposed changes and feedback, and 3) trust the professionals to revise their plans as necessary to address both our concerns and the conditions they experienced on the ride.

Every roadway requires a different treatment.

There is no best type of infrastructure. We do not advocate for protected bike lanes or other such one-size-fits-all solutions. Our roads are all very different, and none were designed for bicycles. Our practice is to actually ride each roadway and work from the designs proposed by knowledgeable engineers to help determine its best possible retrofit.

There is no substitute for actually riding the roads.

We can't say it enough — it is not sufficient to simply review maps. Because riding a bicycle is not an intellectual exercise, we must ride the roads with those who are charged with designing them so that they can experience it directly. And because these people are often not road riding cyclists, our job as advocates is to help them feel comfortable riding alongside traffic, and alleviate any fears they may have.

Now admittedly, the case of this protected lane featured a healthy dose of magic, in that all the players were on the same page and committed to going above and beyond to serve local cyclists. Advocacy can surely get a lot messier than that. But for the professionals who work with Yay Bikes!, at least a few things can be counted on regardless: you will be treated with kindness and respect, you will have a reasoned partner in determining the best treatment for each unique roadway condition, and you will be expected to get on your bikes. Now let's ride!

 

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Kids Can Be Kids at Camp Sunrise

Climbing wall at Camp Sunrise

Each summer, Camp Sunrise, a program of ARC Ohio, welcomes as many as 100 children infected or affected by HIV/AIDS to experience the joys of friendship and support of a caring community in an encouraging, stigma-free environment. 

Camp Sunrise provides a unique opportunity experience traditional summer camp activities within a supportive, accepting, and encouraging community. Campers are divided by age into cabin groups – each with a theme chosen by campers themselves. Campers ages 16 and 17, known as the Sundogs, participate in teen-focused leadership programming in addition to general camp activities.

Camp Sunrise activities focus on developing friendships, trying new and different things, and having fun. For many campers, particularly the Sundogs, Camp Sunrise is also a place to address HIV/AIDS and the role it plays in their lives.

Children spend their days doing a variety of activities, including arts & crafts, sports, music, swimming, horseback riding, high ropes and more. Nighttime activities include campfires, pool parties, movie nights, karaoke and talent shows.

 

I like coming to Camp Sunrise because I know I can be myself and not be judged. I love all the support I have and the activities are so much fun.

-Camp Sunrise camper

 

For more information, visit the Camp Sunrise website.

 

A ropes course at Camp Sunrise

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